Drench


This week, we've been drenching our bodies in a big pool of water- a lido pool  perched on the edge of the ocean containing salt water.  The boundaries are not always clear.  If you hold your head at just the right angle, you can feel yourself floating in the harbour with yachts and motorboats.  A four year old, a seven year old and a 37 year old are all drenched in ocean water, up to our necks.  This trick makes us all the same height and weight.  To cause to drink, to drench, to be covered up to the neck, all works to unhitch some anchor we were once moored to.  We come out of the water, still untethered, floating obliviously back into the heat and mounting obligations and rule bound structures.

drench*

verb (used with object)
1.
to wet thoroughly; soak.
2.
to saturate by immersion in a liquid; steep.
3.
to cover or fill completely; bathe: trees drenched withsunlight.
4.
Veterinary Medicine to administer a draft of medicine to (ananimal), especially by forceto drench a horse.
5.
Archaic to cause to drink.

Origin: 
before 900; Middle English drenchen, Old English drencan,  causativeof drincan  to drink cognate with Dutch drenken, German tr√§nken  towater, give to drink

*Dictionary.com

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