Cocoon*

On Sunday, my son rigged up a sheet as a sling between the couch and a chair.  For hours, he hung out in this suspended sheet cradle.  He was happy to be held by it and often made references to being a baby again.  At one point, he asked that we talk about babies.  I could not help thinking as I glanced over several times that day that his contraption looked like a cocoon. He regularly would emerge from the cocoon but he rarely moved from his position.
The mind can weave itself warmly in the cocoon of its own thoughts, and dwell a hermit anywhere.  James Russell Lowell
On a cold rainy day like today, I would like one of these cocoon (hopefully a sturdier one!) almost more than anything else.

*

co·coon

[kuh-koon]
noun
1.
the silky envelope spun by the larvae of many insects, assilkworms, serving as a covering while they are in the pupalstage.
2.
any of various similar protective coverings in natureas thesilky case in which certain spiders enclose their eggs.
3.
a protective covering, usually consisting of polyvinylchloride, sprayed over machinery, large guns on board ships,etc., to provide an airtight seal and prevent rust during longperiods of storage.
4.
any encompassing protective or hermetic wrapping orenclosure resembling a cocoon: a cocoon of gauze.

dictionary.com

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